Apostille

The apostille is intended to save part of a chain of verifications required of a person seeking to present a public certificate from one country to another. Thus, for example, before the Hague Convention of 1961 (the Apostille Convention) was created, the same person had to verify the public certificate in the competent authority that issued it, verify the signature of that authority in the foreign ministry of that country, and finally, verify the foreign ministry’s signature in the diplomatic or consular mission. Of the country in which he wishes to present the document. This procedure is required even today in cases where a person seeks to present a public certificate of one country in another country, when one of those countries is not a signatory to the Apostolic Convention. For example, a person seeking to present an Israeli birth certificate in Canada (which is not a signatory to the Apostille Convention) must issue the certificate to the Ministry of the Interior, verify the signature of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs registry clerk, and then verify the Foreign Ministry’s signature at the Canadian Embassy in Israel. This becomes even more complex when a person seeks to present a public certificate from one country to another, which has no official representation in the country that issued the certificate.

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